This no frills headset from Razer has been built to provide gamers with a headset that sounds good, feels comfortable and costs less. To be fair to them, they came pretty close. The aluminium frame is both lightweight and flexible. The retractable mic feels robust. The headband doesn’t clamp too hard on your head and the sound-isolating ear cushions feel plush. 
The Void Pro RGB also has an excellent microphone, and is usually my headset of choice when I put in the occasional appearance on The RPS Electronic Wireless Show. It’s a great sounding headset as well, but its virtual 7.1 surround sound effects aren’t the best, hence its position as ‘runner-up’ rather than our overall winner. You also need to fire up Corsair’s Cue software to use it, as there isn’t a dedicated button to enable it on the headset itself.

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This new headset features the close and comfortable fit of the Arctis range. With a freshly styled gunmetal finished headband supported by a swappable ski goggle-style band that can be easily tightened or loosened depending on your preference. This design is surprisingly comfortable as it's the material headband that sits on your head, not the metal, so you don't get an unpleasant pressure on your noggin while you're gaming.
Having a higher-end gaming headset is great because 1) you have high-quality sound that can give you an edge in your game (especially if foot steps or FX are critical, such as when we played Counter-Strike because hearing the enemy before they heard you was an obvious advantage). Not only can you hear footsteps\sound FX quicker than the others but also the direction they come from can also be easier to decipher if your headphones are built well.

Our only issue with the sound quality is the fact you are restricted to a 3.5mm analogue connection, which can cause sketchy feedback hums. You won’t notice it too much while playing, but content creators using a single audio channel in OBS/Shadowplay will definitely be affected. So, be aware. Although it’s not expected for the price point, we’re glad Corsair haven’t thrown a bolt-on virtual 7.1 feature in to the mix. That, coupled with the lack of RGB or clichéd gamer styling, tells us Corsair are trying to sell this headset based on its utility in an already overcrowded space. The HS50 is incredible value for money. It sounds awesome, is a pleasure to wear, and avoids all the gimmicks that usually turn us off. A digital connection would have been nice, and sure, a DAC (like the one on the Arctis Pro) would remedy this, but that extra cost negates the most attractive thing about the HS50. 
The only thing bigger than the size of this beastly headset is its sound. Out of the box, the ManO’War 7.1 has a spacious mix, giving the upper register room to breathe on top of bombastic, rich bass. When connected to PC via USB, the 7.1 further enhances the size and space the headset’s drivers create. The result is a fantastic auditory experience.

Speaking of audible pleasure, the sound produced by the Flight is very good indeed. Delivering a satisfying blend of lows and mids that really add a sense of weight to your gaming endeavours. The highs, although a little harsh the louder you push them, stay bright and detailed for the most part. We really enjoy the simple look of the Flight, and, while we are so over black and red, it works well here. So, we’ll let it slide. However, the rotating ear cups - while cool and practical - feel delicate when they pivot. It’s also worth noting that wireless functionality doesn’t work for Xbox One consoles. You’ll need to connect using the 3.5mm jack, at which point your mic stops working. Yikes. At least that protects other players from some of the nerd rage.

To help you on your quest (literally in some cases), we’ve picked out the best gaming headsets you can buy for any system. This list covers both major consoles, as well as PC and Nintendo Switch, so you can get your game on in style. If you’re looking for the best PlayStation 4 headsets or Xbox One headsets specifically, we have lists for those, too.
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