Gaming headsets are much more than standard headphones. They differ in a number of ways and are designed to ensure that every gamer has everything they need for comfortable, immersive gameplay. Gaming headsets are lighter and feature ultra-soft ear cushioning that allows you to play for longer in comfort. Most headsets also feature multicoloured LED lighting so you can personalise your gaming experience and match your customised gaming set up. Multi-system compatible, they’re also built to deliver stunning sound quality whether your playing via PC, Xbox 360, PS4 or PS3.
But perhaps more important for the purposes of this guide, I’ve been a hardcore gamer since 1980. I’m primarily a PC gamer these days, although I do dabble in consoles from time to time (when a new Gran Turismo game is released, for instance, or for the occasional round of Worms). And whether I’m playing massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPGs), strategy games like Civilization VI, shooters like Doom, or the latest version of Magic: The Gathering, chances are good that I’m logged in to my private Ventrilo chat server, either to coordinate group attacks or to chew the fat with my gaming friends and guild mates. Granted, I’ll probably never break the personal record I set back in October 2011, when I played Rift for 24 straight hours during an Extra Life charity event, but I tend to spend at least 15 to 18 hours per week wearing a headset.
The $99 HyperX Cloud II headset is the best midrange headset because it's the whole package. Not only does it do the job quite well by delivering punchy, ear-tingling audio, but it has awesome features other headsets lack and goes above and beyond what you expect from a headset for the price. For example, though it's a USB headset you can simply disconnect its cable from the included 7.1 surround sound dongle and connect it to any device with a 3.5mm jack, including an Xbox, PlayStation, Switch, or phone.
This headset had way too many reviews (most positive) to not put it in here last. It’s worth looking at because of the feedback from others (can always trust a headset that has 2k+ reviews). It’s another budget-friendly pair that gives you average specs: 40 mm drivers, decent frequency range, pretty good microphone and audio quality, and a pretty nice look (in our opinion). Take a look at it and read the reviews yourself, it may convince you go with our last pick. Engadget’s SA-708 review rated them very positively.
Where this headset falls short is with its requirement for the Tactical Audio Controller (sold separately) to get to the EQ presets. It costs an extra $150, which in our opinion is ludicrous. On top of that the microphone is average at best. A real shame as the headset is amazing as standard, and if it afforded the EQ preset options and a better mic, it could easily be in our top 5. As it is, we’ll include it, but it needs some serious rethinking.
The Audio Technica ATH-ADG1x is one such headset. This is open-air, high-fidelity stereo gaming headset that's designed to deliver a comfortable gaming experience with light, open and natural sound delivered straight into your ears. If virtual surround sound isn't your thing, but the idea of impressive audio experiences, with a superior frequency response appeals then this might be the headset for you.
The H7 Tournament Edition is Creative’s flagship gaming headset, and although the high contrast colorway might steer some off course, what’s going on below deck will leave competitors with a sinking feeling. With its upgraded 50mm FullSpectrum drivers, the H7 sounds amazing: delivering a rich and full tone across games, movies and music, it truly is one of the better sounding sets in our list. It might not handle mids and highs quite as well as the Sennheiser PC 373D, but cutting half the price makes that an easy compromise to live with. The microphone is also decent, and, while it doesn’t hit the heights of a dedicated USB condenser, it’s up there with the slightly more expensive Arctis 7.
Firstly, I'd like to commend customer service rep. , Renee. R. Rodriguez. She absolutely went the extra mile to see that my challenges were squashed, as well as her calming and patient manner. As for the rest of the company, all I can say is that I'm grateful that they're here for me. As usual, I get into an insurmountable jam while working on a project and that's when I call-on Newegg. They've always been about doin' what's right for me. .the customer. Good people doing good business. Thanks guys.
What game you mostly play – You don’t have to constrain yourself to just one game obviously, however it is still important to keep present when shopping for a headset. Is your game of choice based a lot on sound and how accurate you need the foot steps and FX to be? If so, you should pay particular attention to headphone sound quality, which we will highlight if applicable (although may cost a bit more).

Although not technically a noise-cancelling headset, the design of the headset does deliver a passive noise-isolation which helps block out a lot of the external noise which might interrupt and ruin your gaming immersion. Another highlight of the design of the Turtle Beach Elite Pro Professional headset is the ProSpecs Glasses Relief System. This is a unique design we've not seen elsewhere, which allows you to adjust the fit of the earcups to create a small channel in the cushioning to account for the arms of your spectacles and reduce the pressure on your head as you game. A nice addition and an extra level of comfort. 
We run the risk of appearing to be in the tank for Kingston, but even before I pointed out the brand of the HyperX Cloud Stinger, all of our testers agreed that it was the new budget gaming headset to beat. Unlike the company’s previous low-cost headsets, the Cloud Stinger isn’t just a neutered version of the original Cloud. This model includes a fantastic new lift-to-mute mic that sounds great, and it’s big enough to fit the largest of noggins comfortably for hours on end. Despite its all-plastic construction, the Cloud Stinger feels more solid and durable than many of its high-priced competitors. And while its sound isn’t as neutral or impactful as our pick’s, the results are far better than you might expect, with good detail, solid bass, and midrange that doesn’t sound nasal or quacky.
A headset combines a headphone with a microphone. Headsets are made with either a single-earpiece (mono) or a double-earpiece (mono to both ears or stereo). Headsets provide the equivalent functionality of a telephone handset but with handsfree operation.[1] They have many uses including in call centers and other telephone-intensive jobs and for anybody wishing to have both hands free during a telephone conversation.
Looking for a more immersive gaming experience? For truly immersive gameplay, you need to lose yourself in the audio as well as the visual. Our gaming headsets allow you to experience crystal clear stereo surround-sound, putting you at the very centre of the action and bringing the latest games to life. Whether you’re into eSports, MMO or cutting-edge VR, you’ll find a headset designed for you.
It sounds great, too. HyperX chalks it up to the Alpha’s dual-chamber technology, which separates bass frequencies from the mids and highs. That could be the case, or it could be a gimmick—I’ve discussed it at greater length in our review. Either way, the upshot is that the Cloud Alpha sounds as good or better than plenty of its more expensive competition, and with slightly more bass kick this time around. (Read our full review.)
Pulling them from the packaging I was a little concerned about how they might sound. My prejudices were quickly dismissed as soon as I started using them. The 50mm directional drivers deliver an impressive, balanced sound, with a decent amount of separation in the audio. The Stinger, then, is a well-priced headset with a surprisingly detailed sound.
Some Bluetooth office headsets incorporate Class 1 Bluetooth into the base station so that, when used with a Class 1 Bluetooth headset, the user can communicate from a greater distance, typically around 100 feet compared to the 33 feet of the more usual Class 2 Bluetooth headset. Many headsets supplied with these base stations connect to cellphones via Class 2 Bluetooth, however, restricting the range to about 33 feet.
After a combined 200 hours of testing over the course of nearly two-and-a-half years, including listening to 10 new models this year, we still think Kingston’s original HyperX Cloud is the best gaming headset for serious PC gamers. The HyperX Cloud offers the best mix of audio performance and comfort for the money. It’s beautifully built and comfortable on a wide variety of heads, and its sound quality holds up against some of the best dedicated headphones in its price range. You won’t find a more neutral-sounding and versatile gaming headset unless you’re willing to spend at least $40 or $50 more.
If everything about the HyperX Cloud sounds appealing but you just need some extra oomph in your action-gaming audio, you’ll find a lot to love about Razer’s revamped Kraken Pro V2 with oval ear cushions. That distinction is important, by the way, because the Kraken Pro V2 comes with round ear cushions in its default form. The larger oval alternative, whose opening measures 60 mm by 70 mm, gives the headset more room to breathe and makes it more comfortable on a larger variety of heads. And if you’ve purchased the Kraken Pro V2 in its default form, with its 56 mm round cushions, the oval replacements add an extra $20 to the price. So if you’re at all concerned with long-term comfort, and especially if you have larger ears, we cannot stress enough the importance of purchasing the oval-equipped model from the get-go.
The A50 have a good wireless range and a 13 hour battery life, which should be more than enough for most gaming sessions. They also have dock charging, which is easy-to-use and looks great on your TV stand but it takes 6 hours to fully charge the headphones which is not ideal. On the upside, the available PC app allows you to customize the EQ and save different presets.
But I’m still replacing it. Why? Well, aesthetics are a huge reason. If you want an indication how Logitech’s design language has shifted in the past year or so, look no further than the G933 and G533. The G933 was all sharp angles and science fiction. The G533 on the other hand is sleek, professional, restrained. With a piano-black finish and soft curves, it looks like a headset made by Audio-Technica or Sennheiser or a more mainstream audio company—not necessarily a “gaming” headset. I like it.
Make no mistake about it, though, this is probably too much bass for games that rely on atmospheric music or have a lot of dialog. While all of our testers loved the effect with big dumb action games like DOOM, we found that the deep bass tended to make dialogue in games like Battlefront 2 a little too chesty, and it did no favors to orchestral game soundtracks, like those of the Civilization games. Tweaking the EQ settings in the Razer Surround Pro software helped a lot, and also brought out a good bit more detail, but access to that feature does add another $20 to the cost of the headset.
When it comes to sound quality, this headset is fully capable and delivers a superb audio experience with deep bass notes, a good range and an impressive positional audio experience thanks to the DTS Headphone: X 7.1 surround sound technology. Although perhaps not as impressive as some of the other headsets on this list, the sound here is certainly high-quality and accurate. 
The build quality is exceptional at this price, with a design not dissimilar to our favourite HyperX headset. It’s comfy, lightweight and it doesn’t clamp down on your head like an alligator snapping turtle, unlike some headsets we’ve tested. The built-in controls on the left earcup are a welcome touch – preferable to in-line controls – and keeps the cable nice and light. The mic is removeable, sounds decent enough for party chat, and features great manoeuvrability.
Initial setup requires installation of the SteelSeries Engine software which allows you to switch between profiles (with different equaliser settings) depending on what program/game you've launched – therefore you can set it to music for Spotify or to gaming when you launch your favourite games without the need to manually change in the settings each time.
With the MixAmp, you can set audio preferences for game or chat depending on what you're doing, whether that's enjoying the world of God of War thanks to the Dolby button or creating a private network with other ASTRO A40 owners while you make a raid in Destiny 2. The ability to daisy chain MixAmps to create a private voice network is a serious bonus with this headset. And if you game on PC or Mac, the ASTRO Command Center will allow you to get into the nitty gritty audio quality and really allow for deeper sound customization.

Sound quality is an essential consideration for any gaming headset purchase. While headsets often deliver stereo sound with a single speaker for each ear, many models feature additional speakers per ear cup to deliver a true, very impressive surround sound experience. Though it may seem like a no-brainer, comfort is also very important, since you may be wearing your headset for hours at a time. Look for headsets that have padded or foam headbands and ear cups. Many headsets with microphones include noise cancellation which helps the person you're competing with hear you by differentiating between your voice and background noise. And volume control may be important to your game experience, which is why many headsets include a separate control switch that adjusts in-game chat independently of game audio.
That said, you’re going to get a lot more distance and freedom from a wireless headset, which makes them best for large living room setups where you’re going to be sitting on one side of the room and your console or PC is at the other. Keep an eye out for battery life ratin, as well. Most headsets can survive for at least a few straight hours of play, but there’s nothing worse than having to stop in the middle of an intense match to plug in your headset’s charging cable once the batteries are tapped.
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